The wows, what-ifs, and “What is that?” of high-rise design

There’s still time to enter your jaw-dropping design in eVolo Magazine’s 2017 Skyscraper Competition. But you’d better draw fast if you want to make the early-bird deadline: it’s today, November 15. (The final deadline is January 24, 2017.)

The contest awards architects with the biggest and boldest imaginations, recognizing “outstanding ideas that redefine skyscraper design [using] novel technologies, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations,” according to the entry guidelines. Check out some of last year’s winners below. Even if none of these structures ever end up being built, the renderings provoke thought about what a skyscraper could be, and perhaps some elements of these far-out designs will be incorporated into the tall towers of tomorrow.

drone-skyscraper

Photo courtesy of v2com

The Hive: Drone Skyscraper, by Hadeel Ayed Mohammad, Yifeng Zhao and Chengda Zhu. (Second place in 2016) The architects envision this vertical drone hangar as “an infrastructure project that can better meet the emerging demand for incorporating advanced drone technology into daily life in New York City.”

 

sustainable-skyscraper-enclosure

Photo courtesy of v2com

Sustainable Skyscraper Enclosure, by Soomin Kim and Seo-Hyun Oh. (Honorable mention in 2016) The design repurposes an existing skyscraper, encasing it in a climate adjusted zone and installing an “energy purifying system” that captures solar energy and harvests rainwater.

 

air-stalagmite

Photo courtesy of v2com

Air-Stalagmite, by Changsoo Park and Sizhe Chen. (Honorable mention in 2016) In this towering air purifier, “a gigantic vacuum placed at the bottom of the building sucks polluted air to be cleaned by a series of air filters located on the higher levels. The particles are then accumulated and used as building material to further construct the skyscraper.”

 

valley-of-the-giants

Photo courtesy of v2com

The Valley of Giants, by Eric Randall Morris and Galo Canizares. (Honorable mention in 2016) In a barren area of Algeria, the architects propose “a series of towers that would (1) house plant-spores, (2) produce, collect, and treat water, and (3) pollinate the surrounding landscape, catalyzing the production of an oasis in the region.”

 

vertical-shanghai

Photo courtesy of v2com

Vertical Shanghai, by Yuta Sano and Eric Nakajima. (Honorable mention in 2016) It may look like a pile of houses that tumbled out of a toy chest, but the architects designed this structure as a homey, diverse antidote to the waves of plain high-rises wrought by China’s rapid urbanization. This one deserves a second look—see the sectional rendering below. Any contractor care to bid on the project?

vertical-shanghai-2

This post was written by Suffolk Construction’s Content Writer Patrick L. Kennedy. If you have questions, Patrick can be reached at PKennedy@suffolk.com. You can also connect with him on LinkedIn here or follow him on Twitter at @PK_Build_Smart.

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